April books-I-started-and-still-need-to-finish (you have to finish books to have favorites)

Just in time to still be in May! Oof, and now I need to start corralling my May reads. BLARGH. Anyway, as much as I have enjoyed starting a habit of sharing my “favorite reads” lists per month with y’all, April was filled with articles and half-read books. My “reading” shelf on Goodreads is waaaaay too long, even considering the number of books I tend to read at any given time.

HEY. I have varying interests and prefer to be in the mood for every particular book I pick up, when I have the luxury of doing so. SUE ME.

So in lieu of a “favorite things I read in April” list, I give you: the “Books I started in April and still need to finish” list.

A Treatise of Human Nature by David Hume. In our Hume class, we skipped the last book in Dialogues to read his Enquiry on morals. (Book III dealt with morals, but apparently not as well.) I’d like to read Book III now, especially now that I have some experience with his moral philosophy, and see how Hume developed his ideas further in the Enquiry.

A Progress of Sentiments by Annette Baier. A book on Hume! Fresh! Baier emphasizes Hume’s deeply literary approach to philosophy and tries to tease out a sort of narrative theme in Dialogues. I remained a touch skeptical after the first half of her book, but again — I need to read the rest to really get what she’s on about. My professor says this book should be considered a classic, so I think I’m the one needing adjusting.

A Yogacara Buddhist Theory of Metaphor by Roy Tzohar. I had good intentions to read this for a paper I wrote for my Buddhism class, and those intentions were not fulfilled. Tragic. I’m honestly really looking forward to reading this, as I love metaphor and love analyzing language. It will be fascinating to read about it in the context of a specific and still relatively unfamiliar-to-me Buddhist school of thought.

Nagarjuna’s Middle Way by Mark Siderits. I read many bits of this, but not all. I get a little annoyed with the “middle way” school of thought (it tends to devolve into nothingness and just wishy washy clever avoidance of committing to anything), but it’s interesting in the hands of a brilliant thinker like Nagarjuna.

Paving the Great Way: Vasubandhu’s Unifying Buddhist Philosophy by Jonathan C. Gold. I don’t have much to say about this book. I’m not terribly into it so far, but again — it was assigned for class, and Vasubandhu is a brilliant thinker. I owe it to him and to the field of Buddhist philosophy in general to give it a spin.

Self no Self? edited by Mark Siderits (this is from last year, so I NEED TO FINISH THIS SELECTION OF ESSAYS ALREADY. IT IS MAKING ME CRANKY TO SEE IT ON MY “READING” LIST EVERY DAY OF EVERY WEEK OF EVERY MONTH)

Oh, and I also need to relearn French. I ordered a work book from Amazon, so now I have something to do with my Saturday mornings! I don’t do “down time” all that well. This will be a very learn-y summer and I’m excited.

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