An ethics course that actually helps people *be* more ethical

A few weeks ago, one of my favorite philosophy tweet follows, Nigel Warburton (@philosophybites), British philosopher and host of the fantastic podcast, Philosophy Bites, tweeted a question (a tweet I can no longer find because I am tech-inept) that was something to the effect of: If you were to teach an ethics class that was … Continue reading An ethics course that actually helps people *be* more ethical

Zoom is the Splenda of human connection

My organization, like many, is 5 months into ???@#$*$#& (eff) months of working remotely. Aka, work is all Zoom all the time. (It's also a tad bit Microsoft Teams, which I'm kind of in love with for collaborative projects! Anyone else?!) Internal meetings, external meetings, trainings, celebrations, pau hanas, performance evaluations, on-boardings, board meetings, caucuses... … Continue reading Zoom is the Splenda of human connection

Your Brain on Philanthropy: Relative Comparison biases

Earlier this year (just days before the State of Hawaii was issued a shelter-in-place order) I attended a Planned Giving seminar. The main speaker was Russell James, and wow. I was all a-tingle with nerdy joy at the content and depth of his research. He works for Texas Tech and researches the psychological influences on … Continue reading Your Brain on Philanthropy: Relative Comparison biases